Increasing Demand For Full Investigation Into NATO War Crimes In Libya

Editor’s Note:
Although this may seem like meaningless rhetoric, I have been advised that it may prove to have surprising consequences.

According to my source,
“This is the only initiative that will have any weight and that has the resources and backing to really make trouble for NATO.”

My source also advised me to encourage people to take grassroots action and file war crimes complaints against their individual governments. He applauded this initiative and the template offered:

LEGAL TEMPLATE FOR FILING WAR CRIMES CHARGES AGAINST NATIONS AND OFFICIALS INVOLVED IN THE WAR AGAINST LIBYA

He reinforced the critical importance of citizens taking this action as it empowers them and strengthens national sovereignty.

You will find in my introdution to the template, the founders and creators of this project hold that same view and it is expanded upon there.

The critical point that activists need to grasp is that there will be no justice for Libya unless each person participates in the process of demanding it.

Signing petitions and hoping teams of International lawyers will take NATO on and win under the current system is unrealistic. We must each do our part so that any efforts made at other levels has a greater chance of success.

Alexandra Valiente
Libya 360°

Incoming U.N. diplomat calls for Libya NATO investigation

The incoming UN Security Council president called on Wednesday for an investigation into human rights abuses committed during Nato’s bombing campaign to oust Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi.

South Africa’s UN Ambassador Baso Sangqu, who holds the rotating Security Council presidency for January, said he believed Nato overstepped its mandate enforcing a no-fly zone, killing an untold number of innocent civilians.

“We were alive to the fact that the implementation of the resolution itself would have its own problems, but we now hear strong voices that talk about many mistakes that were made,” Sangqu said. “They were supposed to be precision strikes, but it was clear that those were not that precise.”

Sangqu said the UN human rights officials are currently conducting investigations on the ground, but demanded that they must look at all parties involved.

“There must be investigations of human rights abuses in Libya across the board: by Gaddafi regime supporters, by the rebels, by Nato, anybody who was involved in that conflict as mandated by the resolution 1973 and 1970 should be held accountable especially those that were mandated,” Sangqu said.

Sangqu, who said he was speaking in his capacity as South Africa’s ambassador, said he believed the Security Council resolution that his country supported only a no-fly zone but did not mean “regime change or anything else”.

Sangqu’s remarks echoed a similar call by Russia’s UN Ambassador Vitaly Churkin, who recently expressed unhappiness with Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon over the UN chief’s comment that Nato acted within its mandate in its bombing campaign in Libya.

Russia has also called for an independent UN investigation of civilian casualties. Syria’s President Bashar Assad is a close Russian ally.

Nato spokesperson Oana Lungescu denied that the alliance exceeded its mandate or that the bombing resulted in a large number of civilian casualties.

“Throughout the operation, we took every precaution to minimise the risk to civilians with solid intelligence, a very strict target selection and precision-guided munition,” Lungescu said, speaking from Belgium.

“And we repeatedly warned civilians to stay away from military installations and equipment. We did everything we could to reduce the risk, while also making clear that in an air campaign that risk can never be zero.”

AP

UN diplomat wants Libya NATO investigation

Michael Astor

The incoming U.N. Security Council president called Wednesday for an investigation into human rights abuses committed during NATO’s bombing campaign to oust Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

South Africa’s U.N. Ambassador Baso Sangqu, who holds the rotating Security Council presidency for January, said he believed NATO overstepped its mandate enforcing a no-fly zone, killing an untold number of innocent civilians.

“We were alive to the fact that the implementation of the resolution itself would have its own problems, but we now hear strong voices that talk about many mistakes that were made,” Sangqu said. “They were supposed to be precision strikes, but it was clear that those were not that precise.”

Sangqu said U.N. human rights officials are currently conducting investigations on the ground, but demanded that they must look at all parties involved.

“There must be investigations of human rights abuses in Libya across the board: by Gadhafi regime supporters, by the rebels, by NATO, anybody who was involved in that conflict as mandated by the resolution 1973 and 1970 should be held accountable especially those that were mandated,” Sangqu said.

Sangqu, who said he was speaking in his capacity as South Africa’s ambassador, said he believed the Security Council resolution that his country supported authorized only a no-fly zone but did not mean “regime change or anything else.”

Sangqu’s remarks echoed a similar call by Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin, who recently expressed unhappiness with Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon over the U.N. chief’s comment that NATO acted within its mandate in its bombing campaign in Libya.

Russia has also called for an independent U.N. investigation of civilian casualties. Syria’s President Bashar Assad is a close Russian ally.

NATO spokeswoman Oana Lungescu denied that the alliance exceeded its mandate or that the bombing resulted in a large number of civilian casualties.

“Throughout the operation, we took every precaution to minimize the risk to civilians with solid intelligence, a very strict target selection and precision-guided munition,” Lungescu said, speaking from Belgium. “And we repeatedly warned civilians to stay away from military installations and equipment. We did everything we could to reduce the risk, while also making clear that in an air campaign that risk can never be zero.”

UPDATE: South Africa raps UNSC over Libya crisis

Jan 12, 2012
presstv.ir

South Africa President Jacob Zuma shakes hands with UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon while acting as president of the United Nations Security Council at the UN headquarters in New York, January 12, 2012.
South African President Jacob Zuma has censured the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) for mishandling the crisis in Libya which ended with the killing of the country’s ruler Muammar Gaddafi.

Zuma, whose country holds the rotating Security Council presidency for January, said on Thursday that an African Union peace plan for Libya was “completely ignored in favor of bombing Libya by NATO forces.”

“The consequences of the actions that were carried out in Libya in the name of the United Nations Security Council have spilled over into other countries in the region,” the South African president told the council meeting in New York.

Zuma made the remarks as he chaired an open debate on the cooperation between the United Nations (UN) and African Union (AU).

South Africa voted in favor of Security Council Resolution 1973, passed on March 17, 2011, which sanctioned a no-fly zone over Libya using the “necessary measures” with the stated aim of protecting civilians against Gaddafi forces.

On March 31, NATO took over the command of implementation of the no-fly zone and carried out hundreds of airstrikes on what the alliance said were military targets, but the attacks led to the death of civilians, too.

Later, South Africa joined Russia, China, and India in opposing NATO’s airstrikes in Libya saying the air raids breached UN resolutions.

South Africa along with Russia called for a UN inquiry into the airstrikes.

Zuma went on to say that African leaders’ views must be listened to prevent conflict in the region.

He warned the Western powers not to make Africa a “playground” for the competitors battling for influence in the continent like they did during the Cold War era.

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